Ophthalmology | Amherst | North Tonawanda
Ophthalmology | Amherst | North TonawandaOphthalmology | Amherst | North TonawandaOphthalmology | Amherst | North Tonawanda

Comprehensive Eye Care


Glaucoma Treatment

Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States. A simple, painless eye exam can detect the disease. With early detection and treatment, glaucoma can usually be controlled and blindness prevented.

Glaucoma can affect anyone from newborn infants to the elderly. It has been estimated that up to 3 million Americans have glaucoma. At least half of those people do not know they have it because glaucoma usually has no symptoms. People who are at a greater risk for glaucoma usually have the following conditions:

  • At least 45 years old without regular eye exams
  • A family history of glaucoma
  • Abnormally high eye pressure
  • African descent
  • Nearsightedness
  • Diabetes
  • Previous eye injury
  • Regular, long-term use of cortisone/steroid products

To detect glaucoma, your physician will test your visual acuity and visual field and test the pressure in your eye. Regular and complete eye exams help to monitor the changes in your eyesight and to determine whether you may develop glaucoma.

Treatments to control glaucoma include medications in the form of eye drops or pills, laser surgery, and conventional drainage surgery.

Diabetic Evaluation and Care

Patients with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing eye diseases that can lead to vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma. In fact, diabetes is actually the leading cause of blindness in the United States.

Diabetic eye conditions often develop without any noticeable vision loss or pain, so significant damage may already be done to the eye by the time patients notice any symptoms. For this reason, it is important for diabetic patients to have their eyes examined at least once a year. Early detection of eye disease can help prevent permanent damage.

Diabetic-related eye problems develop from high blood sugar levels, which can cause damage to blood vessels in the eye. Over 40 percent of diabetic patients will develop some form of eye disease in their life. The risk of developing eye problems can be reduced through regular eye exams and by keeping blood sugar levels under control through a healthy diet and regular exercise.

Cornea & External Disease

The cornea is a thin, clear, spherical layer of tissue on the surface of the eye that provides a window for light to pass through. In a healthy eye, the cornea bends or refracts light rays so they focus precisely on the retina in the back of the eye.

There are many diseases that can affect the cornea, causing pain or loss of vision. Disease, infection or injury can cause the cornea to swell (called "edema") or degrade (become cloudy and reduce vision). Common diseases and disorders that affect the cornea include:

  • Allergies
  • Bullous Keratopathy
  • Conjunctivitis ("Pink Eye")
  • Dry Eye
  • Corneal Dystrophies including Fuchs' Dystrophy and Lattice Dystrophy
  • Glaucoma (High Eye Pressure)
  • Infections
  • Keratitis (Viral Inflammation)
  • Keratoconus
  • Ocular Herpes
  • Pterygium
  • Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
  • Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

Treatment for corneal disease can take many forms, depending on the underlying problem as well as the patient's preferences. Some conditions resolve on their own and many can be treated with medication. If the cornea is severely damaged or if there is a risk of blindness, a corneal transplant may be recommended to preserve vision.

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Ophthalmology | Amherst | North Tonawanda Ophthalmology | Amherst | North Tonawanda

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Ophthalmology | Amherst | North Tonawanda